August 29 – October 13. Monilola Olayemi Ilupeju: Eve of Intuition

Monilola Olayemi Ilupeju: Eve of Intuition
Commencement: Saturday, August 29, 16:00-21:00 (RSVP by clicking here)
August 29 – October 13, Thursday-Saturday 14:00-18:00

Eve of Intuition is a process-oriented exhibition by Nigerian-American artist Monilola Olayemi Ilupeju. During her presence at TIER, she will use the exhibition space as a studio and casual meeting space to explore ideas related to intuition and uncover strategies to disrupt the flow of maintenance of oppressive systems, through interdisciplinary means. The exhibition space becomes a (re)production territory where the separation between the private studio space and the public qualities of the exhibition are blurred.

Within the period of the show the artist will work in correlation to her upcoming performance project at the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin, Wayward Dust. This proposal for the museum is part of a larger project developed in collaboration with Decolonize Berlin and Philip Kojo Metz. The project takes up the difficult task of taking down an installation designed by Hans-Jürgen Buchert, a white German sculptor, in the 90’s that rendered an inaccurate representation of the inside of a slave trade cargo ship. The installation, titled Lifeworld ship, was situated within the Navigation and Shipping Department of the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin, with the well-meaning intentions of introducing the history of the Brandenburg-Prussian slave trade and contextualizing the booming shipping economy within the framework of colonialism. The installation contains 82 life-sized figurines, depicting representations of black people in humiliating and inaccurate ways. The installation was open to the public for 17 years and was publicly criticized for the last several years by a diverse set of voices. Yet, it closed officially just under one year ago, after Ilupeju successfully demanded its immediate closure upon the initiation of the project. Instead of elevating the image of the problematic figurines, Ilupeju is working with the dust that has accumulated in the installation for nearly two decades. While performing an act of maintenance by cleaning the dust, she questions the inherited values that shape the historiography promoted by the institution. She introduces a gesture of reproductive labor that has historically been performed by subaltern labor forces, and particularly women, in the promotion and expansion of capitalism. The process of cleaning also recalls Mierle Laderman Ukeles’ 1969 “Manifesto for Maintenance Art”, where she introduced a series of strategies for putting the reproductive labor of women at the center of the space of enunciation. And, as Mark Fisher writes, “Tradition counts for nothing when it is no longer contested and modified. A culture that is merely preserved is no culture at all.”

The main goal of the performance Wayward Dust is to make visible the physical and intangible particles and processes within dust and within the work of reality-building. Dust is comprised of sloughed off dead skin cells (among other particles like hair, clothing fibers, bacteria, dust mites, bits of dead bugs, soil particles, pollen, and microscopic specks of plastic), covering the styrofoam figurines. Every time someone experiences the installation, they leave a piece of themselves behind. The dust is a residue that has been created by the visitors, employees, and workers—and many non-human agents—of the museum over the past 17 years. Next to this record of presence, it also represents the gradual temporal shift away from overt colonial practices. She will be using this dust collected at the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin as one of the materials to develop her practice.

Leading from this act of maintenance is Eve of Intuition, Ilupeju’s process-oriented exhibition at TIER. Maintenance can be described as the act of causing something to exist or continue without changing. It is a process of preservation, but also of renovation. In socio-political contexts, the maintenance of white supremacy and other discriminatory systems partially depends on the weakening of our senses and collective intuition, exacerbated by an enforced lack of resources. Eve of Intuition is an attempt to recover intuitions and knowledges that have been compromised or corrupted by colonial, biopolitical and social control structures.

Monilola Olayemi Ilupeju is a transdisciplinary Nigerian-American artist and writer living in Berlin. Recurring points of interest in her work include the political processes of perversion, sexuality and intimacy in relation to desire, trauma, and body image, improvisation, intersectional anti-colonial methodologies, queer mechanisms in liberation pursuits, religion and spirituality, and memory, innocence, and the recovery of child selves. Her main concern as an artist, next to the catharsis of creation, is to look at the frayed edges and ruptures of constructed realities and locate spaces where healing, liberation, and (re)generation can take place.

Ilupeju graduated from New York University in 2018 where she studied Studio Art (Honors Studio) and Social and Cultural Analysis, the latter of which focused on the intersections of race and cultural studies, gender and sexuality studies, philosophy, sociology, and political science. The knowledge acquired in these fields continues to inform her practice today. She is also an alumna of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Class of 2018. In addition to her studio practice, Ilupeju has also done extensive curatorial and editorial work with SAVVY Contemporary and Archive Books, among others.
www.monilola.com

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Amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, new constraints are present. Our public program has grown from social closeness in the formats of encounters, workshops and interventions. We charted a course not to work with exhibitions, instead emphasizing the relations between art’s productive and reproductive elements.

With respect to everyone’s health, and abiding by current laws, we take a step back and look at exhibitions as the most convenient format at this moment. Exhibitions can be a powerful collective experience, but one of their constitutive powers is the contemplation of the artworks by the viewer, creating individual readings in shared constellations. It seems to be the best moment to use that capacity in times of necessary small gatherings.We welcome the format of the exhibition, which brings with it certain expectations. We look to the domestic sphere, which has become an especially important site of production in recent months, as a model for institutions, which always depend on reproductive labor. The domestic model also has many problematic aspects, such as exploitation and unrecognition of labor and rights. It is perhaps in the tension between its conflicts and possibilities where the power of the domestic lies. It is also where the possible paths for the reorganization of institutions can be uncovered.

Titled Maintenance! Domestics as Institutional Becomings, acknowledging the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, our series of solo exhibitions and online events for the next months will address the domestic from different vantage points related to institution-making. We are preparing a reader on the topic that will be launched soon as well. During this new program of exhibitions, the previous interventions will remain at TIER. In that way we’ll keep working on the space as an editorial device to be renegotiated, and an ecology of artworks, underlining its conception as an inner garden based on principles of cultivation.

Hygienic measures: The space of TIER is 100 m² total, allowing for maximum 5 occupants. Up to 2 guests and 3 staff are allowed inside simultaneously. For the events, please register a time to visit to ensure that you can enter the space (click here). We provide hand disinfectant at the entrance. Please keep the minimum distance and wear a mask that covers your mouth and nose.

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Existing interventions viewable at TIER:

Luiza Prado de O. Martins, In Weaving Shared Soil, 2020–ongoing
In this long-term project, The Institute for Endotic Research will become home to a small garden of plants associated with revolutionary anti-fascist movements. In promoting this encounter, the garden means to nurture discussions around matters of decolonisation, care and affect, reproductive labor and community-building in times of extreme uncertainty and instability.

Josep Maynou, TIME, 2019
Hanging lamp in the workshop of TIER.

Kanako Ishii, Re-Landscape, 2019–ongoing
Painting in four iterations. Intervention in the front window of TIER

Ana Alenso, green and yellow, boom and bust, 2018
Fountain with oil barrel. Intervention in the front room of TIER

Miguel Prados Sánchez and Pablo Ramón Benitez, Planting Concrete, 2018
Concrete planters. Intervention in the front room of TIER

Shannon Garden-Smith, Upright is fine, but downright is where I am, 2019
Microplush polyester curtains. Intervention in the workshop shelves of TIER

Sofia Lomba, Spongy Bodies / Naked Bodies #2, 2018
Painting. Intervention in the bathroom of TIER

The Institute for Endotic Research, Broken Parliament, 2016
Seating and display infrastructure with painted surfaces at TIER

Sara Pereira, Pulso, 2018
Two-channel sound installation. Intervention in the front room of TIER

Luís Berríos-Negrón, Wardian Table, 2018
Table, blackboard and portable greenhouse

Javier Bravo de Rueda, Ritual Containers, 2019
Ceramics for food presentation and other purposes

Stephen Kent, Were we never fish, 2019
Sculptural centerpiece of the TIER kitchen table

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Publications available for download:




  July 7 – August 8. DULA: Tastes Like Home

DULA: Tastes Like Home
Commencement: Tuesday July 7, 16:00-21:00 (RSVP by clicking here)
July 7 – August 8, Thursday-Saturday 14:00-18:00

Nourishment and connection; a new flavor; a different world; an old memory; an ancestral homeland. Food has always been a bastion of resistance, another form of oral history that connects us to our traditions, ancestors, and embodiment, through textures and flavors. For DULA’s first installation, we share a taste of our stories and our motherlands. An invitation to mindfully address displaced resources and bodies as we ingest history in the form of sweets. Can the act of consuming knowledge through taste prompt us to readdress our place in society, by a broadening of our capacity to empathize, to finally form thoughtful solidarity with one another?

DULA is a diaspora collective based between Berlin and Los Angeles, we believe that care and soft power are revolutionary tools. DULA is Ash Baccus-Clark, Black futurist, speculative neuroscientist, writer; Alexis Convento, Pilipinx-American cultural producer, taste artist; Ludmila Leiva, Guatemalan-Slovak-Canadian multidisciplinary designer, illustrator, storyteller; Chaveli Sifre, Puerto Rican artist focusing on scent as a medium. dula.world

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Amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, new constraints are present. Our public program has grown from social closeness in the formats of encounters, workshops and interventions. We charted a course not to work with exhibitions, instead emphasizing the relations between art’s productive and reproductive elements.

With respect to everyone’s health, and abiding by current laws, we take a step back and look at exhibitions as the most convenient format at this moment. Exhibitions can be a powerful collective experience, but one of their constitutive powers is the contemplation of the artworks by the viewer, creating individual readings in shared constellations. It seems to be the best moment to use that capacity in times of necessary small gatherings.We welcome the format of the exhibition, which brings with it certain expectations. We look to the domestic sphere, which has become an especially important site of production in recent months, as a model for institutions, which always depend on reproductive labor. The domestic model also has many problematic aspects, such as exploitation and unrecognition of labor and rights. It is perhaps in the tension between its conflicts and possibilities where the power of the domestic lies. It is also where the possible paths for the reorganization of institutions can be uncovered.

Titled Maintenance! Domestics as Institutional Becomings, acknowledging the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, our series of solo exhibitions and online events for the next months will address the domestic from different vantage points related to institution-making. We are preparing a reader on the topic that will be launched soon as well. During this new program of exhibitions, the previous interventions will remain at TIER. In that way we’ll keep working on the space as an editorial device to be renegotiated, and an ecology of artworks, underlining its conception as an inner garden based on principles of cultivation.

Hygienic measures: The space of TIER is 100 m² total, allowing for maximum 5 occupants. Up to 2 guests and 3 staff are allowed inside simultaneously. For the events, please register a time to visit to ensure that you can enter the space (click here). We provide hand disinfectant at the entrance. Please keep the minimum distance and wear a mask that covers your mouth and nose.




  July 4. Conclusion of Irene Fernández Arcas: Stand By, with HETY TENXDA

Irene Fernández Arcas: Stand By
Conclusion: Saturday, July 4, 14:00-21:00 (RSVP by clicking here)
June 6 – July 4, Thursday-Saturday 14:00-18:00

One of the elements that became quite fundamental during the recent period is the need for self-care. Since a long time, with Audre Lorde we have learned that self-care is an act of political warfare. This time of necessary confinement has shown again and in a new dimension the radicality of her words. The domestic space, as a conceptual and architectural framework, can be seen as a container for life. It is a domain that is demarcated by visible and invisible structures, by interfaces that regulate the flows of information and materials. It is also the inner space of the self, the space of rituals, morning routines, celebrations of joy, practices of health and the rhythms of the body. In her exhibition at TIER, Irene Fernández Arcas introduces installative elements into the space that institute a flow of ideas and resources related to the inner space of the home and the mind. Through a series of activations, including a durational plant cutting exchange that everyone is invited to participate in, the exhibition emphasizes different facets of her practice. She proposes this constellation of materials and affects as a laboratory to develop a domestic ritual, an invitation to create a space of one’s own, a holistic space to connect with processes of commoning. In this way, she recovers elements of joy and astonishment from the forgotten rhythms of life, and indeed before the institutionalization of the domestic space and rationalization of the body as a discrete element separable from the complex whole. Self-care as a counter-disciplinary ritual might be one of the ways the artist is researching to restore those rhythms.

HETY TENXDA is a project that emerged from the personal searches of it’s two members.
As a plastic artist, Luna Carlos Armengod was feeling somehow trapped in the categorisation of the different art disciplines, so in her search for new ways to express her work in a more complete way she decided to include music to her artistic practice.
Isasi Isasi, on the other hand, felt the need to dig deeper in to the artistic and conceptual world and look for new views and solutions to enhance his music production.

So one could say that this project is an attempt to merge both the musical and the plastic world as well as to overcome the boundaries of both.An ongoing search for ways to express what needs to be expressed in the moment, without worrying about it not fitting in.
Without worrying about it not belonging to a predetermined genre or art discipline.

For this particular event HETY TENXDA will show a short video of a house recorded concert. A small selection of the songs they are currently developing; a glimpse to their world and aesthetic.




  July 2. Berlin Launch of the Agropoetics Reader

Online – Thursday, July 2, 19:00
Berlin Launch of the Agropoetics Reader
With Benjamin Busch, Binta Diaw, Alex Ungprateeb Flynn, Ayesha Hameed, Arlette-Louise Ndakoze, Lorenzo Sandoval, Cleo Wächter and the Agropoetics team Elena Agudio, Lynhan Balatbat-Helbock, Marleen Boschen, and Onur Çimen

Use this link to join: https://meet.jit.si/TheInstituteForEndoticResearch

The AGROPOETICS READER unfolds as a collection of texts that informed, grounded, and nourished SAVVY Contemporary’s Soil Is an Inscribed Body: On Sovereignty and Agropoetics (2019), a yearlong exhibition and research project curated by Elena Agudio and Marleen Boschen. The project was conceived in the framework of The Invention of Science, SAVVY Contemporary’s 2019–2020 programme, devoted to questioning the presumed universality and objectivity of the scientific canon. In this context of reflections and cogitations about the epistemic violence perpetrated by the West against other forms of knowledges, Soil Is an Inscribed Body examined anti-colonial struggles of past and current land conflicts across the world in order to address the invasiveness of neo-agro-colonialism and its extractivist logics.

Invited to contribute to the exhibition and to present an artistic position, The Institute of Endotic Research (TIER) proposed to co-edit a publication together with the curators. The path was longer than expected, the diverted tracks were not few (including a pandemic), but here – for the use of readers and many other agropoets – you can find a materialisation of this collaboration. You can linger on a selection of sources that inspired this research and exhibition, retrace the discussions that appeared along the way of its realisation, and engage with the ideas that grounded and sprouted from the project. At the same time, interwoven, you also encounter texts and materials suggested by TIER in dialogue with the curators.

ACROPOETICS READER
WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY Bengi Akbulut, Yemisi Aribisala, Marwa Arsanios, Luis Berríos-Negrón, Filipa César, Marisol de la Cadena, Ayesha Hameed, INLAND, Mijo Miquel, Asuncíon Molinos Gordo, Huying Ng, Maria Ptqk, Maria Puig de la Bellacasa, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Bouba Touré, Mirellle and Jennifer in conversation with Alex Ungprateeb Flynn, Hervé Yamguen, and the editors Elena Agudio, Marleen Boschen, and Lorenzo Sandoval.

IN COLLABORATION WITH   The Institute of Endotic Research (TIER)
EDITORS   Elena Agudio, Marleen Boschen, and Lorenzo Sandoval
CO-EDITORS   Onur Çimen and Cleo Wächter
DESIGN BY  Cleo Wächter

THE READER CAN BE DOWNLOADED FOR FREE HERE:
https://www.savvy-contemporary.com/en/pillars/publications/agropoetics-reader

http://theinstituteforendoticresearch.org/wp/publications/agropoetics-reader




  June 10. Launch of Objects Before and After the Wall

Online – Wednesday, June 10, 19:00
Launch of Objects Before and After the Wall
With Tlaxcala3 (Ali Cotero and Clara Bolivar), Rodolfo Andaur, Eli Cortiñas, Manuela Koelke and Sung Tieu
Use this link to join: https://meet.jit.si/TheInstituteForEndoticResearch

Download the free PDF here

The publication Objects Before and After the Wall unfurls from our synonymous collaboration with Tlaxcala 3. Over the course of 2019, and culminating on November 9th at the 2nd International Encounter of Objects and Walls, TIER and Tlaxcala 3 hosted a trans-Atlantic exchange that was realized through a public program of screenings, workshops, readings and conversations. In Mexico City, special attention was paid to the development of border walls in Latin America and their ensuing conflicts and contradictions. In Berlin, certain attention was given to the role of the Berlin Wall as a historical site of ideological confrontation, as well as its continued presence as a contemporary media avatar. The publication Objects Before and After the Wall assembles contributions in a variety of formats—five selected by Tlaxcala 3 in Mexico City and five selected by The Institute for Endotic Research in Berlin—alongside responses by the organizers, Tlaxcala 3 (Ali Cotero and Clara Bolivar) and TIER (Benjamin Busch and Lorenzo Sandoval). The publication will be available as a free PDF download on the TIER website from June 10, and printed copies will be for sale at our space in Berlin.

Contributions by: Rodolfo Andaur, Clara Bolívar, Diana Buitrón, Benjamin Busch, Eli Cortiñas, Alí Cotero, Marisol García Walls, Francisco González Castro, Manuela Koelke, Daniela Medina Poch, Alberto Pacheco Benites, Lorenzo Sandoval, Hito Steyerl, Lorena Tabares, and Sung Tieu with text by Karen Fiss




  June 6 – July 4. Irene Fernández Arcas: Stand By

Amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, new constraints are present. Our public program has grown from social closeness in the formats of encounters, workshops and interventions. We charted a course not to work with exhibitions, instead emphasizing the relations between art’s productive and reproductive elements.

With respect to everyone’s health, and abiding by current laws, we take a step back and look at exhibitions as the most convenient format at this moment. Exhibitions can be a powerful collective experience, but one of their constitutive powers is the contemplation of the artworks by the viewer, creating individual readings in shared constellations. It seems to be the best moment to use that capacity in times of necessarily small gatherings. We welcome the format of the exhibition, which brings with it certain expectations. We look to the domestic sphere, which has become an especially important site of production in recent months, as a model for institutions, which always depend on reproductive labor. The domestic model also has many problematic aspects, such as exploitation and unrecognition of labor and rights. It is perhaps in the tension between its conflicts and possibilities where the power of the domestic lies. It is also where the possible paths for the reorganization of institutions can be uncovered.

Titled Maintenance! Domestics as Institutional Becomings, acknowledging the work of Mierle Laderman Ukeles, our series of solo exhibitions and online events for the next months will address the domestic from different vantage points related to institution-making. We are preparing a reader on the topic that will be launched soon as well. During this new program of exhibitions, the previous interventions will remain at TIER. In that way we’ll keep working on the space as an editorial device to be renegotiated, and an ecology of artworks, underlining its conception as an inner garden based on principles of cultivation.

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Irene Fernández Arcas: Stand By
June 6 – July 4, Thursday-Saturday 14:00-18:00
Commencement: Saturday, June 6, 18:00-21:00 (RSVP by clicking here)
Activations: June 12, June 20 and June 25 (see below)

Hygienic measures: The space of TIER is 100 m² total, allowing for maximum 5 occupants. Up to 2 guests and 3 staff are allowed inside simultaneously. For the Commencement on June 6, please register a time to visit to ensure that you can enter the space (click here). We provide hand disinfectant at the entrance. Please keep the minimum distance and wear a mask that covers your mouth and nose.

One of the elements that became quite fundamental during the recent period is the need for self-care. Since a long time, with Audre Lorde we have learned that self-care is an act of political warfare. This time of necessary confinement has shown again and in a new dimension the radicality of her words. The domestic space, as a conceptual and architectural framework, can be seen as a container for life. It is a domain that is demarcated by visible and invisible structures, by interfaces that regulate the flows of information and materials. It is also the inner space of the self, the space of rituals, morning routines, celebrations of joy, practices of health and the rhythms of the body. In her exhibition at TIER, Irene Fernández Arcas introduces installative elements into the space that institute a flow of ideas and resources related to the inner space of the home and the mind. Through a series of activations, including a durational plant cutting exchange that everyone is invited to participate in, the exhibition emphasizes different facets of her practice. She proposes this constellation of materials and affects as a laboratory to develop a domestic ritual, an invitation to create a space of one’s own, a holistic space to connect with processes of commoning. In this way, she recovers elements of joy and astonishment from the forgotten rhythms of life, and indeed before the institutionalization of the domestic space and rationalization of the body as a discrete element separable from the complex whole. Self-care as a counter-disciplinary ritual might be one of the ways the artist is researching to restore those rhythms.

Activations

Durational – Plant Cutting Exchange
Bring your plant cutting and take one from the installation.

June 12, 19:00 – Be healthy, stay now; stay healthy, be now. (online)
A conversation between Irene Fernández Arcas & Maxence Allain – about self care, health, nowness and simple guidelines on staying confident, amid the pandemic crisis and always.
Use this link to join: https://meet.jit.si/TheInstituteForEndoticResearch

June 20 – New Moon Ritual
Spots are limited.
RSVP to hello@irenefernandezarcas.com for information.
We will contact you with details about it.

June 25, 19:00 – Collective Reading (online)
“The erotic, sensuality, mythology and feminism”
With Tarn Rodgers Johns & Irene Fernández Arcas
RSVP to hello@irenefernandezarcas.com
Use this link to join: https://meet.jit.si/TheInstituteForEndoticResearch

Irene Fernández Arcas is an interdisciplinary artist. In her work, she explores new conceptions of spirituality and the healing powers of art. She creates installations, performative rituals, drawing, painting, photography and text. Her artworks are an experiment and a research into personal domestic rituals, womanhood and the process of art itself. They are an invitation into the present moment and the unfolding Now.

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Luiza Prado: In Weaving Shared Soil

In this long-term project, The Institute for Endotic Research will become home to a small garden of plants associated with revolutionary anti-fascist movements. In promoting this encounter, the garden means to nurture discussions around matters of decolonisation, care and affect, reproductive labor and community-building in times of extreme uncertainty and instability.

Initiated by dance curator Elena Basteri, Lorenzo Sandoval and Benjamin Busch (The Institute for Endotic Research), the transdisciplinary project Somatic Charting. The House is the Body develops around the theme of somatics.

Luiza Prado de O. Martins is an artist and researcher whose work engages with material and visual culture through the lenses of decolonial and queer theories. She is particularly interested in technologies and practices related to fertility and contraception, and their entanglements with colonial hierarchies of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and nationality. Her current artistic research project, titled “A Topography of Excesses,” examines the transmission of indigenous and folk knowledges about herbal reproductive medicine in Brazil as a decolonising practice of radical care.




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