September 20. Berlin Art Prize: Garden Reading – Highrise Reading. Sophie Jung and Min-Wei Ting. Read by Susie Meyer

Friday, September 20, 20:00
Berlin Art Prize: Garden Reading – Highrise Reading
Sophie Jung and Min-Wei Ting. Read by Susie Meyer

A highrise housing project in Singapore is the protagonist in Min-Wei Ting’s film I’m Coming Up. During the screening of this slow walk through the building, texts and poems by various authors will be read, combining Ting’s poetic images with thoughts of other times and other places linked by the same life in a highrise building. Followed by a screening of Ting’s film You’re Dead to Me, in which a garden plays the leading role.
Read by Susie Meyer.
In English, French, and German

About Susie Meyer:
Susie Meyer is a German actress based in Berlin

Organized by Berlin Art Prize




  September 10. Sung Tieu, with a text contribution by Karen Fiss. Objects Before and After the Wall, Part 2

Tuesday, September 10, 19:00

 

How does the presence of a wall change the status of the things and the people on each side of it? Approaching this question, artist Sung Tieu reads the text written by Karen Fiss about her work.

Sung Tieu, born 1987 in Hai Duong, Vietnam is an artist based between Berlin and London. Her artistic practice spans installations, performances and public interventions. Forthcoming institutional solo exhibitions include Haus der Kunst and Nottingham Contemporary (both 2020), forthcoming group exhibitions include the David Roberts Foundation (2019) and Prague Biennale (2020), forthcoming performances include Tate Modern. She is part of several art collectives, among them TROI OI, Asia Art Activism, The Forest Curriculum and East London Cable.

Her work takes place at the intersection of transnational movement, global capitalism and the cultural incursions of dematerialised art traditions. Her practice contends with issues of social class divide through the lens of her personal narratives and cultural membership.

Karen Fiss is a writer and curator whose current research examines nation branding in relation to the neoliberal mechanisms of globalization in the contemporary art world and its accompanying exhibition economies. In particular, she focuses on how citizenship and historical memory are commodified and visually produced in postcolonial contexts.  Her past curatorial projects include Necessary Force: Art in a Police State (Art Museum of the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 2015, co-curated with Kym Pinder) and El cine de 1930. Flores azules en un paisaje catastrófico (Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid 2012). She is author of Grand Illusion: The Third Reich, the Paris Exposition, and the Cultural Seduction of France (University of Chicago Press, 2010), co-author of World’s Fairs on the Eve of War: Science, Technology and Modernity 1937-1942 (University of Pittsburg Press, 2015; with Robert Kargon, et al), and co-editor of Discourses: Conversations in Postmodern Art and Culture (with Russell Ferguson et al, MIT Press, 1990). She also contributes articles to a range of magazines on contemporary art, design and architecture. Fiss received her PhD from Yale University and her BA from Brown University. She is professor of Visual Studies and Graduate Fine Arts at the California College of the Arts, San Francisco. Prior to academic teaching, she worked in the curatorial departments of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, and the New Museum in New York City.

Objects Before and After The Wall
This project analyzes the wall as an object from different angles: thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, twenty-five years after the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement and in the geopolitical framework that requires research in Mexico it’s border condition with Central America and with the United States. The wall as an ideological space and the relationship between objects and walls. The notion of the liminal, the crack, the border and other possible unfoldings.
This event is part of a collaboration between Tlaxcala 3 in Mexico City, The Institute for Endotic Research and Berlin Art Prize. Objects Before and After the Wall is a collaboration between Tlaxcala 3 in Mexico City and The Institute for Endotic Research in Berlin. It has the 2019 sponsorship of the Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporéneo for theoretical and curatorial research.
The sixth Berlin Art Prize is supported by the Hauptstadtkulturfonds




  August 31. Berlin Art Prize: Opening Min-Wei Ting, Curated by Berlin Art Prize

Saturday, August 31, 18:00 – 22:00
Berlin Art Prize: Opening
Min-Wei Ting
Curated by Berlin Art Prize

Exhibition: September 1-27
Visiting hours: Thursdays to Sundays from 12 to 6 PM

Using slow, tranquil camera movements, filmmaker Min-Wei Ting (b. 1976, Singapore) traverses the city. His lens runs over concrete, infrastructure, and people, as if they were all objects on the metropolis’ assembly line. Yet, in the rigid rhythm of architecture and space, which are reflective of a regimenting power in Min-Wei Ting’s work, moments of the uncontrolled break through: bird calls trill over the hum of ventilation systems, greenery proliferates in the clearings between skyscrapers, people lose themselves in the crowds.

If for Nothing Else than for Sunday (2019) is a cinematic passage through Singapore’s Little India District. Twice, at different times of day, Min-Wei Ting follows the same route with the camera: during the calm that announces dawn and in the midst of a Sunday evening’s hustle and bustle, when large groups of South Asian migrant workers gather in the quarter. Ting interweaves the two shots, drawing attention to the gestures, actions, lights, and sounds that are sometimes there and sometimes not, giving the space a life of its own.

In Hampshire Road (2019), Min-Wei Ting allows his camera to trail along a single building in Singapore for seven minutes. At the Little India bus terminal, guest workers wait in a seemingly endless line at night for their shuttle back to the sleeping quarters outside the city. While the lens measures the length of the building, it increasingly detects how the architecture socially separates, monitors, and controls those that are waiting.

If for Nothing Else than for Sunday
2019
Single channel HD video with stereo audio
39 minutes 35 seconds
Hampshire Road
2019
Single channel HD video with stereo audio
7 minutes 4 seconds

The Berlin Art Prize was created in 2013 by four Berlin cultural producers to establish an award for Berlin’s artists beyond the art world economy. The concept is simple yet singular: The prize is open to all artists living in Berlin for six months or longer, names and careers are not taken into account, art is the only thing that matters. The prize functions as a subversive cover version of existing art prizes and offers an alternative structure with which art in Berlin can be appreciated, interpreted, and made public.
The sixth Berlin Art Prize is supported by the Hauptstadtkulturfonds

This year the Berlin Art Prize is hosted by 9 different project spaces, and TIER is happy to be one of them. Please join us for the opening on Saturday the 31st of September. The exhibition itself will run from 1 – 27 September, and can be visited Thursdays to Sundays from 12 to 6 PM.




  August 21. Upright is fine, but downright is where I am. Intervention by Shannon Garden-Smith

Wednesday, August 21, 19:00
Upright is fine, but downright is where I am
Intervention by Shannon Garden-Smith

I am not granite and should not be taken for it. I am not flint or diamond or any of that great hard stuff. If I am stone, I am some kind of shoddy crumbly stuff like sandstone or serpentine, or maybe schist. Or not even stone but clay, or not even clay but mud. And I wish that those who take me for granite would once in a while treat me like mud. –Ursula K. Le Guin

At TIER, Shannon Garden-Smith clothes a set of storage shelves in eccentric microplush polyester curtains. Exercising the capacity of the polyester material to retain marks wherever it is touched, she has imprinted a miscellany of shoes treads across the surface of the textiles to be joined by traces of touch made during the curtain’s everyday use. An accompanying artist’s book (with a text contribution from Parker Kay) muses on dozens of photographed tread prints, imprinted in sidewalk cement and road paint before the surfaces dried and hardened—like pseudo trace fossils, fossils that record biological activity (“burrows, boring, footprints, feeding marks” etc) rather than bodies themselves. During a public program on the evening of August 21, Garden-Smith will discuss the pedestrian sublimity of moving through the city searching for harried traces of touch along with the shape of production when moving through the city becomes a dominant site of thinking and making, as space increasingly and untenably belongs to real-estate capitalism.

Shannon Garden-Smith is an artist and (sometimes) writer who lives and works in Toronto/Tkaronto, Canada. She received an MFA from the University of Guelph and BA from the University of Toronto. She has recently exhibited at YYZ Artists’ Outlet (Toronto), Art Metropole (Toronto), Cambridge Art Galleries (Cambridge ON), Birch Contemporary (Toronto), Erin Stump Projects (Toronto), 8-11 Gallery (Toronto).

Her highly tactile, slow processes of sculpture-making explore unproductiveness in order to imagine ways of doing/making/performing that hold too much and too little.

Shannon gratefully acknowledges the support of the Ontario Arts Council




  August 16. Hands.on.matter: Publication launch. Bimonthly programme organized by Sandra Nicoline Nielsen and Tim van der Loo

Friday, August 16, 19:00 – 21.00
Hands.on.matter: Publication launch
Bimonthly programme organized by Sandra Nicoline Nielsen and Tim van der Loo

You are invited to come and celebrate the first season of the hands.on.matter event series. We are on this special occasion launching a publication, which holds essays and project descriptions of the contributions, and notes from the workshops.

Expect food, drinks, a mix of materials and designs summing up themes from the past season and good chats with nice people. We want to say thank you to everyone who has supported us over the last year. Hope to see you there!

Everyone is welcome. Participation is for free.




  August 15. Eli Cortiñas and Hito Steyerl. Objects Before and After the Wall, Part 1

Thursday, August 15, 20:00
Eli Cortiñas and Hito Steyerl
Objects Before and After the Wall, Part 1

For the first part of Objects Before and After the Wall at TIER, a collaboration with Tlaxcala 3 in Mexico City, we will screen Eli Cortiñas’s Walls Have Feelings (2019) and Hito Steyerl’s The Empty Centre (1998). Separated by two decades, the works uncover relations between objects, walls, and the people who move them/move through them.

In Walls Have Feelings, Cortiñas delves into the ecology of objects and their appearance. The video opens onto the microcosm of dictators’ offices, presenting their architecture and interiors. Newly-filmed scenes alternate with close-ups and landscapes views from sourced images and found footage, gradually unveiling the protagonists of the film: office rooms and walls, which contain, hide and reinforce invisible forms of power. Powers, which stemmed from industrial capitalism and political dictatorships, and which in turn influenced the current neoliberal-type of economic production. The film references labour activities, echoing both present and past, corporeal and cognitive, forms of exploitation. It mixes familiar scenes of workers leaving the factory, laboratories producing all-too-human robots, and the works of artists themselves, which all together creates a navigable, hypnotic loop. Cortiñas evokes the object‘s animist power, delving into something that is embedded in them – as the title remind us. The video becomes an open archive in process, which not only speaks of political powers and their resulting oppression. It also processes the very aesthetic through which these powers operate. ‘The ethnic cleansing of history has become a standard procedure’ (…) ‘silencing the past has become a standard procedure’, states Cortiñas. By displaying lost and invisible events, through reworked images, she digs into visual memory, testing both cultural and cinematic memory itself. (Giulia Civardi, London, 2019)

Hito Steyerl’s film The Empty Centre depicts Potsdamer Platz at a time of rapid change in Berlin. While the early days of post-division Berlin may have held the kernel of utopia, the late 90s were marked by property speculation and its attendant, expansive construction sites. In the film, Potsdamer Platz serves as a narrative vessel for a survey of historical moments in Berlin, from its heyday in the 20s, to its destruction and conversion into a “death strip”, to its massive redevelopment after the Cold War by transnational corporations. Steyerl traces the history of ostracism and exclusion of migrants and minorities, at whose expense the notion of a powerful national center is defined. Steyerl’s film serves as a platform for underrepresented voices in political discourse both then and now, examining how the wall as an object – in the concrete and the abstract – steers the flows of people and things.

Eli Cortiñas is a video artist of Cuban descent, born in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in 1979. She was guest professor at the Art Academy Kassel and the Art Academy Mainz and is a newly appointed professor at the Braunschweig University of Art (HBK). Cortiñas has been awarded numerous grants and residencies, including from Fundación Botín, Berlin Senate, Villa Sträuli, Kunstfonds, Goethe Institute, Kölnischer Kunstverein, Rupert, Villa Massimo and Karl-Schmidt-Rottluff. Her artistic practice can be located within the appropriation tradition, using already existing cinema to de- and re-construct identities as well as narratives according to new discourses. Her collage-like video essays and installations mix found imagery with documentary strategies. Her work has been presented in solo and group exhibitions at museums such as Museum Ludwig, Kunsthalle Budapest, CAC Vilnius, SCHIRN Kunsthalle, SAVVY Contemporary, Museum Marta Herford, Kunstraum Innsbruck, Centro Atlántico de Arte Moderno, Centre Pompidou, Museum of Modern Art Moscow, Kunstmuseum Bonn and MUSAC et al., as well as in international festivals such as Riga Biennale, Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, Mardin Biennale, International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, International Curtas Vila Do Conde and Nashville Film Festival. She lives and works in Berlin.

Hito Steyerl was born in 1966 in Munich. She currently lives and works in Berlin.
Steyerl has studied at the Academy of Visual Arts, Tokyo and the University of Television and Film, Munich.
She also completed a doctorate in philosophy at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna.
Steyerl is the recipient of the 2019 Käthe Kollwitz Prize from Akademie der Künste in Berlin. In 2015, Steyerl was awarded the EYE Prize from the EYE Film Institute Netherlands and the Paddy & Joan Leigh Fermor Arts Fund. In 2010, she received the New:Vision Award from the Copenhagen International Documentary Festival.
Objects Before and After The Wall
This project analyzes the wall as an object from different angles: thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, twenty-five years after the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement and in the geopolitical framework that requires research in Mexico it’s border condition with Central America and with the United States. The wall as an ideological space and the relationship between objects and walls. The notion of the liminal, the crack, the border and other possible unfoldings.

Objects Before and After the Wall is a collaboration between Tlaxcala 3 in Mexico City and The Institute for Endotic Research in Berlin. It has the 2019 sponsorship of the Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporéneo for theoretical and curatorial research.




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